Christmas Selection 19

Barely Legal

Set Descending Direction
per page

6 Items

Set Descending Direction
per page

6 Items

Barely Legal: Banksy and the Los Angeles Exhibition in 2006

In 2006 Banksy organized the Barely Legal exhibition in a warehouse in Los Angeles.

As every Banksy's artwork expresses a clear message, a criticism or a denunciation, so also the Barely Legal event was an explosion of points of reflection, metaphors and accusations.

The Barely Legal exhibition was the first direct and intended contact between critics, collectors and other artists with Banksy's street art and ideology.

The turnout was very high: the street artist in fact acted in big, creating not just an exhibition but a real show.

One of the elements that created the most scandal but at the same time made those present reflect was the presence of a 37 years old Indian elephant.

The animal was painted taking up the fantasy of the wallpaper in the room, becoming a living metaphor for the elephant in the room.

Through the show, Banksy wanted to address delicate issues, such as poverty, which is precisely the elephant.

The problem of poverty, very present and widespread in the world today, is ignored by most people, who pretend and are convinced that it is not so serious and worrying.

Hence at the Barely Legal Show, Banksy decides to address the "false" blindness of people: the elephant becomes the symbol of poverty, deliberately neglected because camouflaged with wallpaper.

Despite the attempt to cover it up, the problem remains and manifests itself with all its grandeur and heaviness.

The artworks in the Barely Legal Show: Banksy and social criticism

The artworks in the Barely Legal Show were sculptures, screen-prints and, as we have seen, even an elephant, through which Banksy expressed a criticism of today's society.

Of all the artworks at the Barely Legal Show, the most domain was the Barely Legal Print Set.

The Barely Legal Print Set, so direct and edgy, not only became the success of the show, but it also won the role of the most searched set in the street art market.

The Barely Legal Print Set consist of six prints that are characteristic of Banksy's street art style and pungent humour.

After designing the drawings that would be the subject of his screen prints, Banksy proceeded with the concrete realization of the prints.

In July 2006, he turned to one of the best printers in Los Angeles, Richard Duardo of Modern Multiples, to print his new artworks, the protagonists of the Barely Legal Show.

Once the work has been agreed, Banksy no longer gave news of it to the printer Duardo; Banksy reappeared 10 days before the exhibition with the artworks to be printed.

For a week, the printshop worked tirelessly to produce the six limited edition prints, each in 500 copies.

Banksy Barely Legal Print Set for Sale

The screen prints belonging to the Barely Legal Print Set for Sale are:

  • Grannies;
  • Sale Ends;
  • Applause;
  • Trolleys;
  • Festival - Destroy Capitalism;
  • Morons White.

Banksy had also designed a seventh print for the Barely Legal Print Set.

The subject depicted was an aristocrat who had been thrown a cake on his head.

Because of the short time available, the work was not printed as a screen print, but was still present at the Barely Legal Show as a one-off painting.

All the artworks belonging to the Barely Legal Print Set are not signed but are provided with the Certificate of Authenticity issued by Pest Control.

The screen prints of Banksy belonging to the Barely Legal Print Set feature in the online and on-site collection of the Deodato Art Gallery.